Staying on the branching path.

Looking through book after book after book, I had no idea how to evaluate their potential usefulness. I didn’t know what aspects were going to be important to me and what methods would work best for me. After I left the bookstore, I felt a little discouraged and overwhelmed. All the work I had done, all the progress I felt I had made, and I still felt like I was at square one. How could I keep moving forward? What was my next step?

I woke up feeling a lot more hopeful and decided to jump into some of the more “advanced” topics at Codecademy. The lessons didn’t always make sense, but I figured some of the knowledge would trickle in and, more importantly, I was just getting familiar with the entire process. Familiarity felt like an important goal. I thought back to my friend’s advice, “… start there.” I had started there, right? I mean, here I was, learning, but was that really starting?

Up to this point, I had done all my work inside the Codecademy lessons. It really is an incredible site, with a built in IDE and a test window. Maybe, however, it was time I started writing code in my own “space.” It was time to find an IDE that I could use, and wow are there a lot to choose from. Off the top of my head, there are: Visual Studio Community, JetBrain’s WebStorm, Sublime Text, and Eclipse, and that’s just the ones I knew about before I really started looking. I settled on none of these, but that was only because I had an additional requirement that I hadn’t given any though to until that moment.

I do most of my work from a desktop PC running some flavor of windows. I have no special preference for them, and would gladly try any of those IDEs from the list above. But occasionally, I am away from my desk, and that means I am working on a Chromebook. Once again with help from my friends, I discovered the world of cloud IDEs. It turns out there is actually a lot of choice here too. I quickly chose two tools in this category and haven’t spent much, if any, time examining the other options. The two I latched onto are Cloud9 and JSFiddle. I also jumped into one more piece of software, even though I didn’t then understand why I needed it, GitHub. There’s a lot to say about these tools, and some day I will. For now it’s enough to say they work very well.

I spent the next week or so reviewing my lessons and trying to apply them in new and creative ways. Patching code together helped me push against the constraints of my knowledge, and there were many times I was running a few steps ahead of reasonable. I made a lot of mistakes. Logical mistakes. Syntactical mistakes. Spelling mistakes. Creative mistakes. I wish I could say I learned from every mistake, but I did learn from enough of them. Most importantly, I started to understand what I needed. What would keep me motivated and progressing.

So, back to the bookstore I went, and this time I was confident enough to buy a couple of books to take home with me. “Head First JavaScript Programming” by Freeman & Robson, and “Sams Teach Yourself jQuery and JavaScript”. From skimming through the Head First book, I saw that it had some projects to build. That appealed to me, as well as the less formal writing style. Having now progressed through the book, I can say that it does a really good job of building concepts and reinforcing the knowledge at every step. Like the software tools above, there is a lot to say about both of these books, and I hope I will get a chance to review them in the future. This is also the first time I have even mentioned jQuery, so maybe it seems a bit strange to jump right into buying a book about it, but I knew it was time to explore the world of JavaScript libraries in general and jQuery specifically.

Next time, I’ll talk about putting all of this together and actually “getting started”!

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